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St Patrick's, Colebrook (Editor's photo)

Tasmanian Pilgrimage

...Fr Suresh sang a Missa cantata. En route, from time to time we said the Rosary (ten decades each day), sang ...

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Bill Murray on Religion, Canonisation and the Liturgy

Bill Murray on Religion, Canonisation and the Liturgy

Like the new pope, he walks among us. By Lyle Dunne I’ve never been sure about Bill Murray. Ghostbusters was fun, Groundhog ...

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Stained Glass Windows for Churches May Make Comeback With Younger Generations

Stained Glass Windows for Churches May Make Comeback With Younger Generations

By Michael Gryboski, Christian Post ...67 percent chose the word "classic" to describe their ideal church. Only 33 percent preferred a ...

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Vocations in Australia

Vocations in Australia

By Lyle Dunne To sustain a population of 2000 diocesan priests... you’d need around 150 men entering the seminary annually, meaning ...

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Tasmanian Pilgrimage

Gary Scarrabelotti 26 March, 2015 0 Comments

…Fr Suresh sang a Missa cantata. En route, from time to time we said the Rosary (ten decades each day), sang hymns, conversed and enjoyed the pleasant weather and scenery. …Being a Catholic affair, we quenched our hard-earned thirst and enjoyed a pleasant dinner together in a local pub each evening.

By Joshua

Readers will be aware that Oriens is a bit of a fan of Pilgrimages; some of you will recall that in May 2014 we ran a series of posts on various pilgrimages including the Whitsunday Paris-Chartres pilgrimage, its antipodean “daughter”, the annual Christus Rex pilgrimage from Ballarat to Bendigo – and the Ely to Walsingham pilgrimage inspired by the latter, which might be thought of as a “grand-daughter”.

Today I’m pleased to present a report from our old friend Joshua (you may recall his piece on the TLM in Hobart which we linked in June 2014) on the inaugural Tasmanian “granddaughter” of Paris-Chartres, wherein your humble servant was further humbled, as the chronicles record. (I’ve lifted the report, with permission, from Joshua’s excellent blog Psallite Sapienter which you should have a look at; note especially the St Patrick’s Day post recording the excellent developments in relation to the traditional Mass in Tasmania, with now a monthly (sung!) EF Mass in Launceston in addition to every Sunday (and first Friday) in Hobart.

Editor.

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 2015

St Patrick’s, Colebrook (Editor’s photo)

A small group of friends and I spent the weekend on a Lenten pilgrimage: on Saturday, we walked from St Joseph’s Church in Hobart to St John’s Church in Richmond (25 km); and on Sunday, another 28 km to St Patrick’s Church, Colebrook. The three churches mentioned are all historic: St Joseph’s, built 1841, was Hobart’s original pro-cathedral; St John the Evangelist’s, built 1837, is the oldest extant Catholic church in Australia; and St Patrick’s, Colebrook, built 1857, is a perfect Pugin design.

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Communion for the Divorced and “Remarried”: a Little Light Shed by W. Shakespeare.

Gary Scarrabelotti 28 February, 2015 0 Comments

… the real tensions arise from an attempt to separate doctrine from practice; teaching from pastoral action; eternal salvation from earthly “integration’.

By Kerry Mellor

The first session of the Synod on the Family, as it has come to be known, has set up some pretty formidable tensions in the Catholic Church. It remains to be seen whether the second session, due in October of this year, will see those tensions resolved, or, God forbid, intensified.

At the superficial level, that of the newspaper commentary, or the Radio/TV sound bite, the game appears to be a struggle between “Progressives” and “Conservatives”, a.k.a. “the Orthodox”. But the real tensions arise from an attempt to separate doctrine from practice; teaching from pastoral action; eternal salvation from earthly “integration’. In a metaphysical sense, there is a body of theological scientists who are attempting to split the atom. And we know from the physical world where that can lead.

Claudius

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Bill Murray on Religion, Canonisation and the Liturgy

Gary Scarrabelotti 2 February, 2015 0 Comments

Like the new pope, he walks among us.

By Lyle Dunne

I’ve never been sure about Bill Murray. Ghostbusters was fun, Groundhog Day very clever, but Lost in Translation seem a more apt title than its makers intended, even on a re-watching after a visit to Japan. And I haven’t seen St Vincent.

And he’s a bit, well, weird. Even by Hollywood standards, ie even apart from what could best be described as a complicated moral life, and marital history.

Murray at Cannes in 2012. Photograph: Dominique Charriau/WireImage

Yet the truth can emerge from surprising places. In a free-ranging interview of Murray by Catherine Shoard of The Guardianthe question of religion came up:

His parents were Irish Catholics; one of his sisters is a nun. This conspicuous religion adds to his broad church appeal (there’s a citation from the Christian Science Monitor on his golfing memoirs). You don’t need to ask if his faith is important to him. He talks about how 19th-century candidates risk not getting canonised because the church is keen to push ahead with the likes of John Paul II and Mother Teresa. “I think they’re just trying to get current and hot,” he smiles.

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Stained Glass Windows for Churches May Make Comeback With Younger Generations

Gary Scarrabelotti 29 January, 2015 0 Comments

By Michael Gryboski, Christian Post

…67 percent chose the word “classic” to describe their ideal church. Only 33 percent preferred a trendy church as their ideal.

Photo: Wikipedia.com

Churches fitted with ornate stained glass windows may not become a thing of the archaic past just yet, noted one church construction company.

Although presently the stained glass industry has been experiencing a decline in business, research among younger Americans indicates that stained glass could experience a comeback.

Derek DeGroot, architect with the Aspen Group, a company that specializes in building churches, explained to The Christian Post on Monday the current trend.

“Although certain denominations still use stained glass traditionally, many mainline protestant denominations that we designed & built for have seen an apparent decline in the use of stained glass in the recent past,” said DeGroot.

“However, there are new discussions that stained glass is seen more favorably by younger generations.”

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Vocations in Australia

Gary Scarrabelotti 29 January, 2015 0 Comments

By Lyle Dunne

To sustain a population of 2000 diocesan priests… you’d need around 150 men entering the seminary annually, meaning a seminary population of about 700: 3 to 4 times the current number.

We’ve looked at vocations in France (Apres Nous le Deluge? July 2014) and in the US (Vocations and Adoration, May 2014). Now it’s time to look closer to home.

It’s hard to get comprehensive data on vocations in Australia, which makes the pessimist in me wonder if bad news is being concealed.

However I’ve been looking at the “FAQ” site of the Australian Catholic Bishops’ Pastoral Research Office.

Ordination of Fr Ashley Caldow, Bendigo,14 Sept 2013. Photo: Newmanparish.org

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