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Stained Glass Windows for Churches May Make Comeback With Younger Generations

Stained Glass Windows for Churches May Make Comeback With Younger Generations

By Michael Gryboski, Christian Post ...67 percent chose the word "classic" to describe their ideal church. Only 33 percent preferred a ...

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Vocations in Australia

Vocations in Australia

By Lyle Dunne To sustain a population of 2000 diocesan priests... you’d need around 150 men entering the seminary annually, meaning ...

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Liturgy: Means or End?

Liturgy: Means or End?

By Peter Kwasniewski, New Liturgical Movement, November 2014 Editor’s Comment: I received this some time ago (you’ll note it refers to ...

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Review of Exodus: Gods and Kings

Review of Exodus: Gods and Kings

Reviewed by: Lyle Dunne Christian Bale’s Moses... takes a 21st-century view of plagues and smiting, and thus his relationship with God ...

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Review of The Vatican Museums

Review of The Vatican Museums

by Lyle Dunne The Zeitgeist was always going to intrude. But the good news is that the reality of unfashionable but ...

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Stained Glass Windows for Churches May Make Comeback With Younger Generations

Gary Scarrabelotti 29 January, 2015 0 Comments

By Michael Gryboski, Christian Post

…67 percent chose the word “classic” to describe their ideal church. Only 33 percent preferred a trendy church as their ideal.

Photo: Wikipedia.com

Churches fitted with ornate stained glass windows may not become a thing of the archaic past just yet, noted one church construction company.

Although presently the stained glass industry has been experiencing a decline in business, research among younger Americans indicates that stained glass could experience a comeback.

Derek DeGroot, architect with the Aspen Group, a company that specializes in building churches, explained to The Christian Post on Monday the current trend.

“Although certain denominations still use stained glass traditionally, many mainline protestant denominations that we designed & built for have seen an apparent decline in the use of stained glass in the recent past,” said DeGroot.

“However, there are new discussions that stained glass is seen more favorably by younger generations.”

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Vocations in Australia

Gary Scarrabelotti 29 January, 2015 0 Comments

By Lyle Dunne

To sustain a population of 2000 diocesan priests… you’d need around 150 men entering the seminary annually, meaning a seminary population of about 700: 3 to 4 times the current number.

We’ve looked at vocations in France (Apres Nous le Deluge? July 2014) and in the US (Vocations and Adoration, May 2014). Now it’s time to look closer to home.

It’s hard to get comprehensive data on vocations in Australia, which makes the pessimist in me wonder if bad news is being concealed.

However I’ve been looking at the “FAQ” site of the Australian Catholic Bishops’ Pastoral Research Office.

Ordination of Fr Ashley Caldow, Bendigo,14 Sept 2013. Photo: Newmanparish.org

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Liturgy: Means or End?

Gary Scarrabelotti 28 January, 2015 0 Comments

By Peter Kwasniewski, New Liturgical Movement, November 2014

Editor’s Comment: I received this some time ago (you’ll note it refers to events toward the end of 2014) and have been vacillating about whether to post it. (Happily the issues are not time-critical.) In the end I decided to, not because I believe the author sustains his thesis with absolute conviction – I have considerable sympathy with the commentators on the article, whom I strongly suggest you read – but because it raises some important points.

If you want my five cents’ worth, I think the problem lies in identifying liturgy as a means to a HUMAN end, such as creating unity among worshippers or bringing people into the Church. Worthy though these aims may be, they are not the point of liturgy.

The broader questions of whether the encounter with Christ Incarnate should best be seen as a means to the Glory of God, or whether the Sacrifice of Calvary, and hence that of the Mass, is primarily a means of securing our salvation, I am content to regard as above my pay grade.

Catholics today might sometimes be struck by the passionate conviction of the younger generation of Catholics who are fighting for the cause of the Sacred Liturgy. It is as if we are fighting for dear life, in a struggle to the bitter end, against our mortal enemies. The reason is simple: we are doing exactly that.

The Sacraments. Source: New Liturgical Movement

It is no exaggeration to say that there is a fundamentally false view out there, very popular nowadays, as captured in this paragraph from Whispers from the Loggia of November 24:

The office’s [i.e., Congregation for Divine Worship’s] new mission is likely to hew closer to Francis’ own liturgical approach—as one op summarized its principles: “Go by the book. Don’t make a fuss about it. And remember that liturgy’s always a means to an end—not an end in itself.”

That’s the error in a nutshell: the liturgy is a means, not an end.

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VATICAN SEEKS INPUT FOR 2015 SYNOD

Gary Scarrabelotti 10 January, 2015 0 Comments

By Lyle Dunne

The Vatican is seeking your view on the Synod on the Family.

I received this today:

Following the Extraordinary Synod on the Family in October, Pope Francis and the Synod of Bishops are once again seeking responses to questions as part of their preparation for the 2015 Synod on the Family.

The theme for the Second Synod on the Family is “The Vocation and Mission of the Family in the Church and the Contemporary World”.??Engaging in this questionnaire is a way to take an active role in shaping how we share the Gospel and respond to the needs of those around us.

A series of 30 questions on this theme has been made available by the Australian Bishops for the further consideration of the faithful. It will take approximately 15 to 30 minutes to complete.

Submissions close COB 9th February. Please feel free to share!

So I’m sharing.


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Looking to the East

Gary Scarrabelotti 10 January, 2015 0 Comments

By Lyle Dunne.

There has been extensive debate about which of the liturgical “reforms” was the most significant: that abandonment of Latin; new and multiple Eucharistic prayers; the abandonment of aids to focus on the significance of the Eucharist like altar rails, Communion on the tongue and kneeling; the new cycle of readings…

Personally I’ve always thought the idea of orientation was crucial: abandoning the symbolism of a congregation praying together, through the priest, to go, in favour of a symbolism of a closed conversation among the human participants.

Ad Orientem (Photo: wdtprs.com)

I’ve just received a link to the website of the Church of the Resurrection in Lansing, Michigan, wherein it is disclosed that they have decided to say the (Novus Ordo) Mass ad orientam. I’ve pinched a couple of paras from their website, because I have a feeling that it won’t be on the front page indefinitely:

Praying Ad Orientem

Why We Are Praying Toward The (Liturgical) East At Mass - Read more here

On the First Sunday of Advent 2014, the Church of the Resurrection began celebrating the (Novus Ordo) Mass ad orientem. What that means is that at times during the Mass, especially during the Eucharistic Prayer, the priest and the people face in the same direction, toward the “Liturgical East.” This change followed a period of catechesis and preparation that began two years earlier, when we reflected together on the powerful symbolism of praying toward the  East. Inspired by Pope Benedict XVI’s book, The Spirit of the Liturgy, we began using what is often called the “Benedictine Altar Arrangement.” We placed six candles on the altar, with a crucifix in the center, to help remind us by the very manner of our prayer that we are not praying to each other but rather to the Father, through the Son, in the Holy Spirit. The recent change to celebrating ad orientem is helping us accomplish this goal even more fully.

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