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The FSSP: Growing a Traditional Catholic Apostolate in Mexico

The FSSP: Growing a Traditional Catholic Apostolate in Mexico

Our Lady of Guadalupe is not only the Patroness of Mexico, but the Empress of the Americas. Now I see ...

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Who Would true Valour See...

Finally I decided to do something about it: I went on pilgrimage. A personal note from the editor Loyal readers will have ...

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The Liturgy as a Window to Another World

Martin Mosebach will be familiar to a number of readers as a trenchant traditionalist, and the author of The Heresy ...

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Hundreds of UK Priests Learn Ancient Rite of Mass

Hundreds of UK Priests Learn Ancient Rite of Mass

Hundreds of Priests in the UK gather in the city of Bath to learn how to say the Traditional Latin ...

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Imbuing the Ordinary Form with Extraordinary Form Spirituality

Imbuing the Ordinary Form with Extraordinary Form Spirituality

...since “the greatness of the liturgy depends . . . on its unspontaneity” (Ratzinger), one should, as a matter of principle, ...

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Bishop Schneider on SSPX; Women and foot washing; consecrating Russia; anti-pastoral bishops and much more…

2 February, 2016 0 Comments

The height of confusion and absurdity manifests itself when such semi-heretical clerics accuse those who defend the purity and integrity of the Catholic faith as being against the Pope – as being according to their opinion in some way schismatics.

Our old friend Bishop Schneider, whose visit to Australia we were pleased to co-sponsor, has an exclusive interview with Rorate Caeli:

Bp Schneider Pulpit

Bishop Schneider in Wagga

Last week, Rorate Caeli interviewed His Excellency Bishop Athanasius Schneider, one of the most visible prelates working on the restoration of the traditional Latin Mass and faith, on numerous topics.

In this wide-ranging interview, His Excellency thoughtfully expounded on issues critical to the Church in this great time of crisis. Read the entire interview so you don’t miss His Excellency’s thoughts on the current status of the SSPX,women’s participation in the Mass and the washing of women’s feet, whether Russia was ever truly consecrated to the Immaculate Heart of Mary, Summorum Pontificum and anti-pastoral bishops and much, much more.

All may reprint/repost this interview — but you must credit Rorate Caeli.

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The FSSP: Growing a Traditional Catholic Apostolate in Mexico

21 January, 2016 0 Comments

Our Lady of Guadalupe is not only the Patroness of Mexico, but the Empress of the Americas. Now I see more clearly Her plan to extend anew the sacred tradition of the Church throughout North, Central, and South America.

 

BY , One Peter 5,  

Having just celebrated the grand feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe, I would like to recount in her honor a little bit about the apostolate of the Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter (FSSP) in her beloved country of Mexico. It all began when the English-speaking seminary of the FSSP was founded. Providentially — and seemingly without much discussion about it — Our Lady of Guadalupe was proposed as the titular patroness. As you may or may not know, Our Lady of Guadalupe is not only the Patroness of Mexico, but the Empress of the Americas. Now I see more clearly Her plan to extend anew the sacred tradition of the Church throughout North, Central, and South America.

Photo: One Peter 5

When I entered the seminary in 2001, I met my future confrere, Fr. Kenneth Fryar, who had lived in Mexico City for many years prior, attempting to found a traditional order of Franciscans Friars. As it was not in God´s providence to start the order at that time, he decided to join the FSSP, with which he was studying. Aware that he knew how to navigate through a country with a different manner of driving, I proposed that we go on a pilgrimage as a small group to visit our Patroness, Our Lady of Guadalupe, in Mexico City. And so, we took off from Nebraska in his car during Christmas break of 2002-2003.

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In the Image and Likeness

21 January, 2016 0 Comments
St Francis (Photo: Lyle Dunne)

St Francis restoring the Church (Photo: Lyle Dunne)

THE INADEQUACY OF PHOTOREALISM

“Every beauty which is seen here by persons of perception resembles more than anything else that celestial source from which we all are come.” – Michelangelo Buonarroti

In contemporary art history, modernist theory has always maintained that the goals of figurative arts, both sacred and secular, were a linear objective of achieving similitude—the likeness of the object or image perceived. With the invention of the photograph, this presumed goal was not only achieved but pictorial realism and the photo became quasi-synonymous.

This Darwinian thinking is perhaps why those artistic achievements of naturalism and idealism of form began to all but disappear from both secular and sacred art. This linear thinking held that, with the invention of the camera, all art was free from its former goal of copying the model, from a goal of exactitude with what was considered an idealized form. Compounded with the advent of pictorialism in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the line between photography and art became all too close. Then, with the dawn of impressionism, both it and realism soon replaced the naturalism of painting or drawing from life, along with invention and any use of idealism. The New Realism was king.

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Who Would true Valour See…

21 January, 2016 0 Comments

Finally I decided to do something about it: I went on pilgrimage.

A personal note from the editor

Loyal readers will have noticed that not much new has appeared in these pages in recent times. This is due to a number of factors, including a technical hitch that prevented the site from appearing in its proper format (thanks to the unsung tech guys for fixing that), but mainly a disenchantment with the state of affairs in Rome – at best, a kind of “if you can’t say anything nice, don’t say anything” sentiment – and an associated spiritual malaise.

Finally I decided to do something about it: I went on pilgrimage. Specifically, the Christus Rex Pilgrimage (see www.crex.org) which commences in Ballarat and culminates in Bendigo with Mass for the Feast of Christ the King. This pilgrimage, which celebrated its 25th anniversary in 2015, is the biggest event in traditional Catholicism in Australia.

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Photo: Patrick Giam

While it’s true the pilgrimage commences in Ballarat, I didn’t. The bad news is that the pace of pilgrimage is such that I decided I couldn’t sustain it for 3 days. The good news is there are plenty of young people – and one or two not so young, see below – who can. I joined at about the mid-point, midday Mass at Campbelltown on the Saturday.

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The Old Mass and the New Evangelization: Beyond the Long Winter of Rationalism

12 September, 2015 0 Comments

This is a great resource for dealing with people who still don’t “get” the Extraordinary Form – Ed.

An important lecture by Dr. Kwasniewski, author of Resurgent in the Midst of Crisis: Sacred Liturgy, the Traditional Latin Mass, and Renewal in the Church, reprinted in Rorate Caeli, September 2015

Dr. Peter Kwasniewski

Dr. Peter Kwasniewski delivering this lecture at the Franciscan University of Steubenville (Photo: Rorate Caeli)

Why has the liturgical reform of the 1960s and 1970s failed to produce a new springtime in the Church?[6] What, in contrast, is the secret of the old Latin Mass’s appeal—the reason or reasons for its suprising resurgence in our day, when most of the people who celebrate or attend it were born after 1970?

…The attendance of Catholics at Mass has been in steady decline, one might even say freefall, since about 1965—the year when huge changes began to be made to the way in which the Mass had been celebrated for centuries.[2] On the other hand, since the year 1984, when Pope John Paul II first asked bishops to permit priests to celebrate the usus antiquior or older use of the Roman Rite, and particularly since Pope Benedict XVI’s motu proprio Summorum Pontificum in 2007, which dispensed with the need for episcopal permission, the number of traditional Latin Masses available to the faithful, the number of clergy offering them, and the number of Catholics attending them have steadily increased. As of 2013, over 1,000 clergy in North America had completed a formal training program for celebrating the Extraordinary Form. In 1988, there were only about 20 places in the United States where you could find a traditional Latin Mass on Sundays; today, that number has risen to almost 500.[3] In response to an obvious demand on the part of students, faculty, and staff, Catholic colleges and universities are including the Extraordinary Form in their chaplaincy schedules. Religious orders have incorporated the usus antiquior into their way of life or even adopted it exclusively, with the result of a surge in vocations. The average age of Catholics attending traditional Latin Mass parishes or chaplaincies is lower than the national average, while the average family size is higher.[4] It is a vibrantly youthful, flourishing, and expanding movement. As Pope Benedict XVI observed in 2007:
Immediately after the Second Vatican Council it was presumed that requests for the use of the 1962 Missal would be limited to the older generation which had grown up with it, but in the meantime it has clearly been demonstrated that young persons too have discovered this liturgical form, felt its attraction and found in it a form of encounter with the Mystery of the Most Holy Eucharist, particularly suited to them.[5]
Why is all this happening? Why has the liturgical reform of the 1960s and 1970s failed to produce a new springtime in the Church?[6] What, in contrast, is the secret of the old Latin Mass’s appeal—the reason or reasons for its suprising resurgence in our day, when most of the people who celebrate or attend it were born after 1970? And how is this development good for the Church and for the New Evangelization?

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