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The Reform of Holy Week in the Years 1951-1956

The Reform of Holy Week in the Years 1951-1956

In October of 1949 at the Congregation of Rites, a liturgical commission was named which... was to study whether eventual reforms ...

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On the Restoration and Promotion of the Traditional Mass

On the Restoration and Promotion of the Traditional Mass

To the great dismay and frustration of Traditionalists, who rightly see the Mass as the heart of the Body of ...

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At the Summit is the Embrace in Havana, but at the Base Unity is Far Away

At the Summit is the Embrace in Havana, but at the Base Unity is Far Away

The Orthodox would rightly point to the dilution and tendency towards banality in the modern Catholic liturgical texts. The Orthodox ...

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A Miracle of Liturgical Art: The Church of the Protection of the Mother of God at Yasenevo

A Miracle of Liturgical Art: The Church of the Protection of the Mother of God at Yasenevo

The marble iconostasis bears jewel-like icons with a powerful Romanesque gravity. It is a vision of medieval splendor the likes ...

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Bishop Schneider: 10 Elements of Renewal in the Liturgy

Bishop Schneider: 10 Elements of Renewal in the Liturgy

During the Eucharistic liturgy – at the very least during the Eucharistic prayer – when Christ the Lamb of God ...

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In Beer Veritas

14 October, 2014 1 Comment

After that last, I need a drink…

By Rod Dreher, American Conservative

I asked Fr. Martin how brewing beer serves the Church. He said that you’d be surprised by how many people who aren’t especially interested in Christianity taste the beer and find that it really tastes good. Then they want to know more about how it’s made, and sooner or later, some of them want to know about the faith. Besides, he said, drinking beer makes the heart glad.

The monks of Norcia are Benedictines who pray the old mass, and who chant the hours in Latin. To be in their basilica during mass or the hours is like stepping into another century. To describe it as aesthetically rich and spiritually nourishing hardly does the experience justice.

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Pitched Battle on a Mad Monday at the Synod

14 October, 2014 1 Comment

From Sandra Magister’s Blog, via Rorate Caeli’s English translation.

I have tried to spare readers too much detail on the Synod. I know it’s important, but it’s also an occasion of scandal, and a danger to one’s faith – or at least mine. But sometimes the message from the secular press needs to be put into perspective. – Ed.

[Rorate’s] conclusion: Bruno Forte made up homosexuality paragraphs by himself

POST SCRIPTUM – In the afternoon of Monday, October 12, “L’Osservatore Romano” gave a first dim account of the pitched battle that burst into the open in the morning in the Synod Hall after the reading of the “Relatio post disceptationem” written by Cardinal-Rapporteur Peter Erdo, with the collaboration – at times with prevarication [prevaricante – “with malicious abuse of one’s position”], as Erdo himself made known in the morning press conference – of Special Secretary Bruno Forte.

Forte acted like a Bugnini for “Gayness”, making things up to achieve his own end.

Under the gunfire of around 41 interventions, Cardinals Pell [Secretary for the Economy], Ouellet [Prefect for Bishops], Filoni [Prefect for Propaganda Fide], Dolan [of New York], Vingt-Trois [of Paris], Burke [Prefect of Apostolic Signatura], Rylko [President of Laity], Müller [Prefect of Doctrine of the Faith], Scola [of Milan], Caffarra [of Bologna] among others spoke up, all against an opening to second marriages as proposed by Cardinal Kasper, who also intervened.

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A Pessimistic Case for Hope

3 October, 2014 0 Comments

By Yuval Levin, First Things.

The prospect of social liberals annihilating their opponents in the public square over the coming years is not much more plausible than the expectation that social conservatives were set to do so in 2004.

Ten years ago this fall, it seemed for a moment like social conservatives might be ascendant in our politics. Immediately after the 2004 election, some analysts on the right and left alike said George W. Bush’s reelection signaled a rising tide of “values voters” who would yield an enduring nationwide advantage for Republicans on social issues.

Photo:" Time" Magazine

In a post-election op-ed that the New York Times’s headline writers subtly titled “The Day the Enlightenment Went Out,” Gary Wills said the American people were giving up on modernity. On CNN the day after the election, conservative commentator Tucker Carlson said “it is clear that it was not the war on terror, but the issue of what we’re calling moral values that drove President Bush and other Republicans to victory.”

Many social conservatives now look wistfully upon that moment and see in the decade that followed what traditionalists are apt to see in the world in general: a sorry decline.

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So you want to be an organist?

3 October, 2014 0 Comments

R. J. Stove, in reminiscent mood, has attempted to oblige tyros with his thoughts on what Mozart called the King of Instruments

The year:  1999. The scene: the choral rehearsal room, St Mary’s Cathedral, Sydney, five minutes before Sunday Mass. The chief organist was away ill. The deputy chief organist was running late. The assistant deputy chief organist was incomprehensibly incommunicado (no texting or social media facilities then, naturellement). An understandable balefulness characterised the conductor’s desperate enquiry of the assembled singers: ‘Is there anyone here with organ-playing experience?’

"...an organ for home use"? (St John's Church, Vilnius University.)

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Mercy vs truth? a Response to Fr McGavin

2 October, 2014 1 Comment

By Lyle Dunne.

One could perhaps speak of a “marriage” having ended – but not a “marriage” in the main Catholic sense:  not the sacrament.

This is a companion piece to in The Family Synod and Practical Atheism, and contains a slightly more detailed response to the article by Father McGavin.

I may as well begin by nailing my colours to the mast.

When people say “You only believe this because you’re a Catholic”, I think the best response is something like this:

“You’re probably right. If I were like most people these days, I’d probably just work out what I wanted to do and retro-fit a rationale. But I belong to a tradition which teaches that the truth is knowable by reason, that moral truth is real and we have a duty to use our intellects to discover it.

“Catholics don’t spend their time arguing that the evidence of our senses can’t be trusted, or the rules of inference are arbitrary. We don’t hold that an all-powerful God can contradict Himself if he likes.

“As GK Chesterton might’ve said, Catholicism is more rational than rationalism.”

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